Mass-Market Paperback Books Vs. Trade Paperback Books: A Guide For Self-Publishers

Synopsis
Here is an explanation of the differences between the two main types of paperback books: mass-market paperbacks and trade paperbacks. As a self-publisher, these are the two formats that you’ll be typically dealing with most often. Therefore, you need to be familiar with and understand the similarities and differences between them. So, here is a quick discussion and explanation of mass-market paperbacks and trade paperbacks.

The Professor with screwdriver

What You Will Learn In This Post
1. You will learn the significant characteristics of mass-market paperback books and a trade paperback books.
2. You will learn how each type of these paperbacks are similar and different.
3. You will learn how British paperback books compare to America’s paperbacks.

Introduction
In the USA, the most common formats for fiction and non-fiction printed books fall into three main categories:

1. Hardcover;
2. Trade paperback; and,
3. Mass-market paperback.

Each of them can then be broken down into several more categories. But here, we’re concerned with understanding the differences between the two types of paperbacks. As a self-publisher, these are the two formats that you’ll be typically dealing with most often. Therefore, you need to be familiar with and understand the similarities and differences between them.

Mass-Market Paperback Books Vs. Trade Paperback Books Infographic

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Here is a quick discussion and explanation of mass-market paperbacks and trade paperbacks:

1. Mass-Market Paperback Books
Overview
For the masses on a budget. A mass-market paperback is a small, usually non-illustrated, and less-expensive bookbinding format. The standard size is 6.75” tall x 4.25” wide, and frequently uses a font, leading (pronounced: ledding), and line spacing that’s smaller. When the big publishing companies sell them, they’re frequently released after the hardcover edition.

And, they’re most known for being sold in non-traditional bookselling locations such as airports, newsstands, drug stores, and supermarkets, etc. Some people refer to them informally as “pocket books.”

Examples of mass-market fiction and non-fiction paperback books.

Examples of mass-market fiction and non-fiction paperback books.

A. Sales And Distribution
The books that are in the non-traditional locations are generally within the periodical-distribution industry. These books are distributed by the same companies that are placing magazines in these locations. Conversely, the trade paperbacks are distributed by book wholesalers and distributors – or trade channels – hence the name “trade paperback.”

Title page of a mass-market paperback book. The paragraph in the middle discusses the cover and what happens when a book is stripped.

Title page of a mass-market paperback book. The paragraph in the middle discusses the cover and what happens when a book is stripped.

B. Strippable Vs. Non-Strippable
Mass-market paperbacks are also distinguished from hardcover and trade by the different business practices that publishers and booksellers apply to them. Mass-markets are “strippable.” This means that bookstores can rip off the front cover and return only the cover for full credit from the distributor. The book retailers are supposed to destroy the rest of the book. Inversely, trade paperbacks are not strippable. Therefore, the book retailers must return the entire book, not just the cover.

“Understanding the differences between ‘mass-market paperback’ and ‘trade paperback’ formats will help you start to feel and sound like a real book publisher.” (CLICK to tweet this quote)

C. Self-Publishers
When self-publishers publish their fiction books, they’re typically only released in the mass-market format. These books will most commonly never receive a hardcover printing. This format helps keep the cover price down, making these books more attractive to a broader audience in a very competitive market.

2. Trade Paperback Books
Overview
Trade paperbacks are the less expensive version of the hardcover edition. They usually have a thicker cover than the mass-market books. They’re typically the same size as the hardcover books, but slightly smaller because the binding is made differently. And, they don’t have the added thickness, width, and height of the hardcover. One way you’ll know if a book is a trade paperback or not is by looking at the back cover and the title page. Here you would typically find the strippable notice.

Examples of non-fiction trade paperback books.

Examples of non-fiction trade paperback books.

A. Sizes And Cover Price
The self-publishers that write and publish non-fiction will usually publish trade paperbacks. These will typically be 5.5” x 8.5” or 6” x 9”, and the less common 8.5” x 11”. The retail cover price is almost always higher than the mass-market books, and lower than the hardcover editions.

Mass-market paperback on left side, with the triangle and the letter S indicating that the book is strippable; Trade paperback on right side with triangle with no letter S indicating that the book is not strippable. Also notice the price and size differences. In addition, the mass-market book has a UPC barcode; and the trade has a Bookland/EAN barcode.

Mass-market paperback on left side, with the triangle and the letter S indicating that the book is strippable; Trade paperback on right side with triangle with no letter S indicating that the book is not strippable. Also notice the price and size differences. In addition, the mass-market book has a UPC barcode; and the trade has a Bookland/EAN barcode.

B. French Flap
An interesting recent feature of trade paperbacks is the “French-flap,” or gatefold. This feature is an extension of the front and back cover with a folded section over onto itself, just like the paper wraps, or dust jacket, that’s typically found on hardcover books. It’s meant to make the trade paperback appear more like a hardcover edition – but with a lower cover price.

Trade paperback with French flaps, also know as a gatefold. They are an extension of the front and back cover. These flaps mimic the dust jacket of a hardcover book. They also assist the reader as a way to save their place in the book.

Trade paperback with French flaps, also know as a gatefold. They are an extension of the front and back cover. These flaps mimic the dust jacket of a hardcover book. They also assist the reader as a way to save their place in the book.

3. A Quick Note About Paperback Book Formats in the UK
“A Format” is typically 110mm x 178mm (4.33″ x 7.01″), similar to the US’s standard mass-market paperback;
“B Format” is typically 130mm x 198mm (5.12″ x 7.80″), similar to the US’s large mass-market paperback, or small trade paperback;
“C Format” is typically 135mm x 216mm (5.32″ x 8.51″), similar to the US’s standard trade paperback.

Conclusion
Understanding the differences between these two standard book formats will help you start to feel and sound like a real book publisher. Also, when you explore the bookstore shelves, searching for design ideas for your book, you’ll better understand what you’re looking at.

This will help you make a more informed decision about what your book should look like, and what you want it to look like. Hopefully, you are now one step closer to designing and creating a professional-looking book that you can be very proud of.

Questions For Us To Think About And Discuss
1. Have you taken the time to explore the different book formats while browsing in a big book store?
2. What struck you about the differences and similarities?
Let me know in the comments section below.

This article is also posted on LinkedIn.com
This article is also posted on EzineArticles.com

Thank you for reading this. I hope you found it helpful. Please share it.

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About Joseph C. Kunz, Jr.

I help make it easier for anyone with a passion for a subject – and a desire to help others by sharing their experience and knowledge – to self-publish nonfiction books that will help them build authority and credibility, establish them as thought leaders, and help them make more money. Kunz is a husband, father of twins, and the co-founder of Dickson Keanaghan, LLC, a medical training and publishing company near New York City.
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